Project Lifts Limits for Arabic Speakers

27 December 2014

Removing some of the limits facing Christian leaders in the Arabic-speaking world seems like an especially fitting way to launch one of TWR’s major themes for 2013.

“The Gospel Without Limits” is the ministry’s emphasis as the new year begins, and that’s a key characteristic of the ongoing Talmatha project. Meaning “discipleship” in Arabic, Talmatha is a mentoring program that combines radio broadcasts, on-the-ground ministry and complementary study materials to strengthen and educate seekers, new believers and Christian leaders.

“In the Arabic-speaking world, Christians and church leaders struggle to find the resources to grow in the faith,” TWR CEO Lauren Libby wrote in a letter to ministry supporters. “Social, cultural, and political barriers to Christianity hinder discipleship and evangelism. Access to resources and teaching is extremely limited.”

The success of the effort is measured in lives claimed for the Kingdom, as one broadcast listener wrote to us.

“Who would have ever thought that in a country like mine, where neither a Bible nor a church is an option, a Christian radio station would penetrate the walls and be the Church to thirsty and hungry souls?” the listener asked.

 

Removing some of the limits facing Christian leaders in the Arabic-speaking world seems like an especially fitting way to launch one of TWR’s major themes for 2013.

“The Gospel Without Limits” is the ministry’s emphasis as the new year begins, and that’s a key characteristic of the ongoing Talmatha project. Meaning “discipleship” in Arabic, Talmatha is a mentoring program that combines radio broadcasts, on-the-ground ministry and complementary study materials to strengthen and educate seekers, new believers and Christian leaders.

“In the Arabic-speaking world, Christians and church leaders struggle to find the resources to grow in the faith,” TWR CEO Lauren Libby wrote in a letter to ministry supporters. “Social, cultural, and political barriers to Christianity hinder discipleship and evangelism. Access to resources and teaching is extremely limited.”

The success of the effort is measured in lives claimed for the Kingdom, as one broadcast listener wrote to us.

“Who would have ever thought that in a country like mine, where neither a Bible nor a church is an option, a Christian radio station would penetrate the walls and be the Church to thirsty and hungry souls?” the listener asked.

 

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail